Let Me Introduce Myself

         First, let me say Thank You for visiting my website and wanting to learn more about me. My name is Sheila Hoffman. I have been a therapist since 1990 after graduating from Vanderbilt University with a Masters of Education in Human Development Counseling. As a young adult, counseling was not my first career choice.  After several job failures and feeling like I had no place to go, I sought the help of a career counselor and soon discovered that counseling was the profession perfectly suited for me.

        

        Prior to beginning private practice in 2013, I worked in community mental health, therapeutic foster care, and school-based settings, which afforded me experience with children age five through adolescence as well as adults. I have found private practice is where I enjoy my role as a therapist the most. During my career as a counselor, I have also utilized my skills and knowledge through opportunities in my church and community by leading groups for divorce and grief recovery and marriage enrichment.

        

       The approach I use with clients is client-centered, which means I strive first to connect with you as my client, meeting you where you are in life, and then help you to achieve the goals you have for yourself.  I utilize a variety of therapeutic interventions, depending on the needs of each client. The foundation of a trusting relationship between you and the therapist you choose is a necessity for change to take place.

         As a professional counselor, I am continually striving to expand my knowledge base and skills through different training opportunities.  I have received specialized training in Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) for couples, and I am an approved facilitator for the Prepare/Enrich and SYMBIS pre-marital assessments.  Continued education and learning through trainings and reading is something to which I am committed.

         I have been married since 1991 and we have one adult daughter who is now married. My interests include reading, spending time with my family and friends, photography at an amateur level, traveling to new places on occasion, watching movies, and taking care of my home.  

 

“Anything that’s human is mentionable, and anything that is mentionable can be more manageable. When we can talk about our feelings, they become less overwhelming, less upsetting, and less scary. The people we trust with that important talk can help us know that we are not alone.”

Mr. Rogers

Middle Tennessee Counselor